Medical Issues in CA Workers’ Compensation

Medical Issues Workers' Compensation

Best California Workers’ Compensation Lawyer

Medical Issues Workers' CompensationContinuing Legal Education:  Medical Issues in CA Workers’ Compensation Presented by Attorney Nikki Jacobson

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

5:00 p.m.

Los Angeles Paralegal Association

 

Medical Issues In California Workers’ Compensation Claims:   The Importance of Substantial Medical Evidence and the Role of the Treating Physician vs. Evaluating Physician

Medical reports are crucial in any workers’ compensation matter.  This program examines medical issues common to workers’ compensation claims. However, deficient reports may not be construed as substantial evidence and may be stricken or given very little evidentiary weight.  Topics to be covered include:  introduction to the most important medical issues in workers’ compensation, pre-designating a  physician, primary treating physicians (PTP), consulting physicians, evaluating physicians (PQME/QME/AME), AMA Guides 5th Edition; medical causation, impairment, apportionment, types of medical reports (medical-legal, P&S/MMI, supplemental), medical history, substantial evidence (LeVesque, Escobedo and Kuykendal) and more…

Presented by Nikki Mehrpoo Jacobson (Certified Specialist  in Workers’ Compensation Law by The State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization) of Rose, Klein & Marias LLP

For over 20 years, Attorney Nikki Jacobson has been a dedicated advocate for the injured and immigrants from all over the world. She has focused her practice of law exclusively on workers’ compensation, immigration and personal injury law.  She is a Certified Workers’ Compensation Specialist by the California State Bar Board of Legal Specialization.  Ms. Jacobson began her legal career in 1997 after earning her law degree from Pepperdine University School of Law and her admission to The State Bar of California.  She is a highly respected and involved member of the legal community. She has been recognized for legal knowledge and experience by Los Angeles Magazine, Super LawyersAvvo.com and Martindale Hubbell.  Ms. Jacobson is also a Professor of Law at West Los Angeles College.

Deaths At Work – Work Related Fatalities

Deaths At Work - Work Related Fatalities

Deaths At Work – Work Related Fatalities

Deaths At Work - Work Related Fatalities

Request A Free Workers’ Compensation Consultation Now

On December 19, 2018, the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) reported that 376 Californians died on the job in 2016, down slightly from the 388 deaths in 2015.

“Even one workplace fatality is too many, and our thoughts are with the families of those that died on the job last year,” said Christine Baker, DIR Director. “The fatality data released today is a reminder that we must all continue our efforts to reduce workplace safety and health hazards in order to prevent worker deaths.”

A review of the past twelve years indicates that workplace fatalities in California remain below the average rate of fatalities prior to 2008, when the last recession began, and remained flat over the past two years at 2.2 deaths per 100,000 workers. On the national level, the rate of fatalities jumped from 3.4 to 3.6 per 100,000 workers.

There were 376 fatal injuries on the job in California in 2016, compared to 388 in 2015, 344 in 2014, and 396 in 2013. Data comes from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), which is conducted annually in conjunction with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Figures for 2016 are the latest numbers available.

Request A Free Workers’ Compensation Consultation Now

Key findings from the latest census in California include:   Deaths At Work – Work Related Fatalities 

  • One in five (20%) of all California workplace deaths identified in 2016 were attributed to violence and other injuries by persons or animals. The incidence of workplace homicides in 2016 accounts for 12% of all workplace deaths in the state.
  • Nearly two of every five (38%) California workplace deaths identified in 2016 occurred in transportation incidents.
  • One in six (17%) of all California workplace deaths identified in 2016 were attributed to trips, slips and falls; with 90% of those deaths involving falls to a lower level.
  • Nearly two of every five (39%) California workplace deaths in 2016 were Latinos. This fatality rate has fluctuated over the past ten years from 37% to 49%.department is tracking closely. DIR over the past eight years has increased workplace safety outreach and education to Spanish-speaking workers, with a focus on high-hazard work.

Tables reflecting final data for 2016 (and prior years’ final data) for California are posted online, as well as a report reflecting four years’ of fatal occupational injuries in California.

DIR conducts the California Census annually in conjunction with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. CFOI produces comprehensive, accurate and timely counts of fatal work injuries. This Federal-State cooperative program was implemented in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in 1992.

DIR protects and improves the health, safety and economic well-being of over 18 million wage earners, and helps their employers comply with state labor laws. Its Division of Occupational Safety and Health, commonly known as Cal/OSHA, helps protect workers from health and safety hazards on the job in almost every workplace in California. Cal/OSHA does not have authority when injuries occur on public roadways where other state or federal agencies have jurisdiction, such as the California Highway Patrol.

Request A Free Workers’ Compensation Consultation Now

 

Deaths At Work – Work Related Fatalities

Nikki Jacobson

Los Angeles Attorney

Best Workers’ Compensation Lawyer

2018 Mileage Rates for Injured Workers

Nikki Jacobson Los Angeles Workers’ Compensation Lawyer California Attorney

best workers comp lawyer

Mileage Rate for Medical and Medical-Legal Travel Expenses Increases Effective January 1, 2018 For Injured Workers in California

On December 18, 207, the California Division of Workers’ Compensation (DWC) announced the increase of the mileage rate for medical and medical-legal travel expenses by one cent to 54.5 cents per mile effective January 1, 2018.

This rate must be paid for travel on or after January 1, 2018 regardless of the date of injury.  California Labor Code section 4600, in conjunction with California Government Code section 19820 and the Department of Personnel Administration regulations, establishes the rate payable for mileage reimbursement for medical and medical-legal expenses and ties it to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

IRS Bulletin Number IR-2017-204 dated December 14, 2017 announced the rate increase. The updated mileage reimbursement form is posted on the DWC website.

 

 

 

Nikki Jacobson
Los Angeles Workers’ Compensation Lawyer
California Attorney

 

August 2017 Visa Bulletin – Visa Lawyer

Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

Visa Bulletin For August 2017

Los Angeles Visa Lawyer Visa Bulletin

Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

Contact Us Now for a Consultation 

View as Printer Friendly PDF

CHECK YOUR PRIORITY DATE NOW #AskNikki 

A. STATUTORY NUMBERS  Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

This bulletin summarizes the availability of immigrant numbers during August for: “Final Action Dates” and “Dates for Filing Applications,” indicating when immigrant visa applicants should be notified to assemble and submit required documentation to the National Visa Center.   Los Angeles Visa Lawyer   Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

Unless otherwise indicated on the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website at www.uscis.gov/visabulletininfo, individuals seeking to file applications for adjustment of status with USCIS in the Department of Homeland Security must use the “Final Action Dates” charts below for determining when they can file such applications. When USCIS determines that there are more immigrant visas available for the fiscal year than there are known applicants for such visas, USCIS will state on its website that applicants may instead use the “Dates for Filing Visa Applications” charts in this Bulletin.  Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

1.  Procedures for determining dates. Consular officers are required to report to the Department of State documentarily qualified applicants for numerically limited visas; USCIS reports applicants for adjustment of status. Allocations in the charts below were made, to the extent possible, in chronological order of reported priority dates, for demand received by July 11th. If not all demand could be satisfied, the category or foreign state in which demand was excessive was deemed oversubscribed. The final action date for an oversubscribed category is the priority date of the first applicant who could not be reached within the numerical limits. If it becomes necessary during the monthly allocation process to retrogress a final action date, supplemental requests for numbers will be honored only if the priority date falls within the new final action date announced in this bulletin. If at any time an annual limit were reached, it would be necessary to immediately make the preference category “unavailable”, and no further requests for numbers would be honored.   Los Angeles Visa Lawyer  Los Angeles Visa Lawyer Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

2.  Section 201 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) sets an annual minimum family-sponsored preference limit of 226,000. The worldwide level for annual employment-based preference immigrants is at least 140,000. Section 202 prescribes that the per-country limit for preference immigrants is set at 7% of the total annual family-sponsored and employment-based preference limits, i.e., 25,620. The dependent area limit is set at 2%, or 7,320.

3.  INA Section 203(e) provides that family-sponsored and employment-based preference visas be issued to eligible immigrants in the order in which a petition in behalf of each has been filed. Section 203(d) provides that spouses and children of preference immigrants are entitled to the same status, and the same order of consideration, if accompanying or following to join the principal. The visa prorating provisions of Section 202(e) apply to allocations for a foreign state or dependent area when visa demand exceeds the per-country limit. These provisions apply at present to the following oversubscribed chargeability areas:  CHINA-mainland born, EL SALVADOR, GUATEMALA, HONDURAS, INDIA, MEXICO, and PHILIPPINES.  Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

4.  Section 203(a) of the INA prescribes preference classes for allotment of Family-sponsored immigrant visas as follows:

Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

FAMILY-SPONSORED PREFERENCES

First: (F1) Unmarried Sons and Daughters of U.S. Citizens:  23,400 plus any numbers not required for fourth preference.

Second: Spouses and Children, and Unmarried Sons and Daughters of Permanent Residents:  114,200, plus the number (if any) by which the worldwide family preference level exceeds 226,000, plus any unused first preference numbers:

A. (F2A) Spouses and Children of Permanent Residents:  77% of the overall second preference limitation, of which 75% are exempt from the per-country limit;

B. (F2B) Unmarried Sons and Daughters (21 years of age or older) of Permanent Residents:  23% of the overall second preference limitation.

Third: (F3) Married Sons and Daughters of U.S. Citizens:  23,400, plus any numbers not required by first and second preferences.

Fourth: (F4) Brothers and Sisters of Adult U.S. Citizens:  65,000, plus any numbers not required by first three preferences.

A.  FINAL ACTION DATES FOR FAMILY-SPONSORED PREFERENCE CASES  

On the chart below, the listing of a date for any class indicates that the class is oversubscribed (see paragraph 1); “C” means current, i.e., numbers are authorized for issuance to all qualified applicants; and “U” means unauthorized, i.e., numbers are not authorized for issuance. (NOTE: Numbers are authorized for issuance only for applicants whose priority date is earlier than the final action date listed below.)  Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

Family-
Sponsored 
All Chargeability
Areas Except
Those Listed
CHINA-mainland
born
INDIA MEXICO PHILIPPINES 
F1 22DEC10 22DEC10 22DEC10 01FEB96 15OCT06
F2A 22SEP15 22SEP15 22SEP15 01SEP15 22SEP15
F2B 01NOV10 01NOV10 01NOV10 01JUL96 08DEC06
F3 08JUL05 08JUL05 08JUL05 08APR95 22JAN95
F4 08MAY04 08MAY04 22SEP03 15SEP97 08APR94
22MAR05
22MAR05

*NOTE: For August, F2A numbers EXEMPT from per-country limit are authorized for issuance to applicants from all countries with priority dates earlier than 01SEP15. F2A numbers SUBJECT to per-country limit are authorized for issuance to applicants chargeable to all countries EXCEPT MEXICO with priority dates beginning 01SEP15 and earlier than 22SEP15. All F2A numbers provided for MEXICO are exempt from the per-country limit.   Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

B.  DATES FOR FILING FAMILY-SPONSORED VISA APPLICATIONS

The chart below reflects dates for filing visa applications within a timeframe justifying immediate action in the application process. Applicants for immigrant visas who have a priority date earlier than the application date in the chart below may assemble and submit required documents to the Department of State’s National Visa Center, following receipt of notification from the National Visa Center containing detailed instructions. The application date for an oversubscribed category is the priority date of the first applicant who cannot submit documentation to the National Visa Center for an immigrant visa. If a category is designated “current,” all applicants in the relevant category may file applications, regardless of priority date.

The “C” listing indicates that the category is current, and that applications may be filed regardless of the applicant’s priority date. The listing of a date for any category indicates that only applicants with a priority date which is earlier than the listed date may file their application.

Visit www.uscis.gov/visabulletininfo for information on whether USCIS has determined that this chart can be used (in lieu of the chart in paragraph 4.A.) this month for filing applications for adjustment of status with USCIS.

Family-
Sponsored 
All Chargeability
Areas Except
Those Listed
CHINA-
mainland
born
INDIA MEXICO PHILIPPINES 
F1 22JUL11 22JUL11 22JUL11 01APR96 08SEP07
F2A 08APR16 08APR16 08APR16 08APR16 08APR16
F2B 01SEP11 01SEP11 01SEP11 08AUG96 22JUL07
F3 01DEC05 01DEC05 01DEC05 01MAY95 01FEB95
F4 15NOV04 15NOV04 22JUN04 08JAN98 08FEB95

Los Angeles Immigration Lawyers

5.  Section 203(b) of the INA prescribes preference classes for allotment of Employment-based immigrant visas as follows:

EMPLOYMENT-BASED PREFERENCES

First:  Priority Workers:  28.6% of the worldwide employment-based preference level, plus any numbers not required for fourth and fifth preferences.

Second:  Members of the Professions Holding Advanced Degrees or Persons of Exceptional Ability:  28.6% of the worldwide employment-based preference level, plus any numbers not required by first preference.

Third:  Skilled Workers, Professionals, and Other Workers:  28.6% of the worldwide level, plus any numbers not required by first and second preferences, not more than 10,000 of which to “*Other Workers”.

Fourth:  Certain Special Immigrants:  7.1% of the worldwide level.

Fifth:  Employment Creation:  7.1% of the worldwide level, not less than 3,000 of which reserved for investors in a targeted rural or high-unemployment area, and 3,000 set aside for investors in regional centers by Sec. 610 of Pub. L. 102-395.

A.  FINAL ACTION DATES FOR EMPLOYMENT-BASED PREFERENCE CASES

On the chart below, the listing of a date for any class indicates that the class is oversubscribed (see paragraph 1); “C” means current, i.e., numbers are authorized for issuance to all qualified applicants; and “U” means unauthorized, i.e., numbers are not authorized for issuance. (NOTE: Numbers are authorized for issuance only for applicants whose priority date is earlier than the final action date listed below.)

Employ-
ment
based
All Charge-
ability
Areas Except
Those Listed
CHINA-
mainland
born
EL SALVADOR
GUATEMALA
HONDURAS
INDIA MEXICO PHILIPPINES
1st C 01JAN12 C 01JAN12 C C
2nd 01APR15 22APR13 01APR15 22JUL08 01APR15 01APR15
3rd C 01JAN12 C 15JUL06 C 01JUN15
Other Workers C 01JAN04 C 15JUL06 C 01JUN15
4th C C 15SEP15 15SEP15 15SEP15 C
Certain Religious Workers C C 15SEP15 15SEP15 15SEP15 C
5th
Non-Regional
Center
(C5 and T5)
C 15JUN14 C C C C
5th
Regional
Center
(I5 and R5)
C 15JUN14 C C C C

*Employment Third Preference Other Workers Category:  Section 203(e) of the Nicaraguan and Central American Relief Act (NACARA) passed by Congress in November 1997, as amended by Section 1(e) of Pub. L. 105-139, provides that once the Employment Third Preference Other Worker (EW) cut-off date has reached the priority date of the latest EW petition approved prior to November 19, 1997, the 10,000 EW numbers available for a fiscal year are to be reduced by up to 5,000 annually beginning in the following fiscal year. This reduction is to be made for as long as necessary to offset adjustments under the NACARA program. Since the EW cut-off date reached November 19, 1997 during Fiscal Year 2001, the reduction in the EW annual limit to 5,000 began in Fiscal Year 2002.   Los Angeles Visa Lawyer

B.  DATES FOR FILING OF EMPLOYMENT-BASED VISA APPLICATIONS

The chart below reflects dates for filing visa applications within a timeframe justifying immediate action in the application process. Applicants for immigrant visas who have a priority date earlier than the application date in the chart may assemble and submit required documents to the Department of State’s National Visa Center, following receipt of notification from the National Visa Center containing detailed instructions. The application date for an oversubscribed category is the priority date of the first applicant who cannot submit documentation to the National Visa Center for an immigrant visa. If a category is designated “current,” all applicants in the relevant category may file, regardless of priority date.

The “C” listing indicates that the category is current, and that applications may be filed regardless of the applicant’s priority date. The listing of a date for any category indicates that only applicants with a priority date which is earlier than the listed date may file their application.

Visit www.uscis.gov/visabulletininfo for information on whether USCIS has determined that this chart can be used (in lieu of the chart in paragraph 5.A.) this month for filing applications for adjustment of status with USCIS.

Employment-
based
All Chargeability
Areas Except
Those Listed
CHINA-
mainland
born
INDIA MEXICO  PHILIPPINES 
1st C C C C C
2nd C 01OCT13 01FEB09 C C
3rd C 01SEP15 01JAN07 C 01JAN16
Other Workers C 01JUN08 01JAN07 C 01JAN16
4th C C C C C
Certain Religious Workers C C C C C
5th
Non-Regional
Center
(C5 and T5)
C 01SEP14 C C C
5th
Regional
Center
(I5 and R5)
C 01SEP14 C C C

6.  The Department of State has a recorded message with the cut-off date information for Final Application Action which can be heard at:  (202) 485-7699.  This recording is updated on or about the tenth of each month with information on final action dates for the following month.

B.  DIVERSITY IMMIGRANT (DV) CATEGORY FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST

Section 203(c) of the INA provides up to 55,000 immigrant visas each fiscal year to permit additional immigration opportunities for persons from countries with low admissions during the previous five years. The NACARA stipulates that beginning with DV-99, and for as long as necessary, up to 5,000 of the 55,000 annually-allocated diversity visas will be made available for use under the NACARA program. This resulted in reduction of the DV-2017 annual limit to 50,000. DV visas are divided among six geographic regions.  No one country can receive more than seven percent of the available diversity visas in any one year.

For August, immigrant numbers in the DV category are available to qualified DV-2017 applicants chargeable to all regions/eligible countries as follows. When an allocation cut-off number is shown, visas are available only for applicants with DV regional lottery rank numbers BELOW the specified allocation cut-off number:

Region All DV Chargeability Areas Except Those Listed Separately
AFRICA CURRENT Except:
Egypt:     30,600
ASIA CURRENT Except:
Nepal:     7,075
EUROPE CURRENT Except:
Uzbekistan  13,300
NORTH AMERICA (BAHAMAS) CURRENT
OCEANIA CURRENT
SOUTH AMERICA,
and the CARIBBEAN
CURRENT

Entitlement to immigrant status in the DV category lasts only through the end of the fiscal (visa) year for which the applicant is selected in the lottery. The year of entitlement for all applicants registered for the DV-2017 program ends as of September 30, 2017. DV visas may not be issued to DV-2017 applicants after that date. Similarly, spouses and children accompanying or following to join DV-2017 principals are only entitled to derivative DV status until September 30, 2017. DV visa availability through the very end of FY-2017 cannot be taken for granted. Numbers could be exhausted prior to September 30.  Los Angeles Immigration Lawyers

C.  THE DIVERSITY (DV) IMMIGRANT CATEGORY RANK CUT-OFFS  WHICH WILL APPLY IN SEPTEMBER

For September, immigrant numbers in the DV category are available to qualified DV-2017 applicants chargeable to all regions/eligible countries as follows. When an allocation cut-off number is shown, visas are available only for applicants with DV regional lottery rank numbers BELOW the specified allocation cut-off number:

Region All DV Chargeability Areas Except Those Listed Separately
AFRICA Current Except:
Egypt: 36,500
ASIA Current Except:
Nepal: 7,450
EUROPE Current
NORTH AMERICA (BAHAMAS) Current
OCEANIA Current
SOUTH AMERICA,
and the CARIBBEAN
Current

D.  OVERSUBSCRIPTION OF EMPLOYMENT-BASED SECOND PREFERENCE CATEGORY

WORLDWIDE, EL SALVADOR, GUATEMALA, HONDURAS, MEXICO, AND PHILIPPINES Employment-based Second (E2) Preference category:  Readers were advised in item D of the May Visa Bulletin number 6, that it was likely that a date would be imposed at some point. High demand for numbers for USCIS adjustment of status applicants has required the establishment of a date for August. This action will allow number use to be held within the Worldwide E2 annual limit.

The E2 date for these countries will once again become CURRENT for October, the first month of fiscal year 2018.

View as Printer Friendly PDF

 

#AskNikki   If you have any questions about this month’s visa bulletin, please contact us to schedule a consultation.  Los Angeles Visa Lawyer Nikki Jacobson would be more than happy to assist you with all of your family and employment based immigration petitions and applications.  L os Angeles Visa Lawyer 

 

Asylum Appeal – Board of Immigration Appeals Decision

Asylum Appeal

Contact Us Now for a Consultation 

Asylum Appeal – Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Decision: “Material Support” to a Terrorist Organization

Motion to Reconsider – Unpublished Board of Immigration (BIA) Appeals Decision:  BIA Dec. 5-18-17_Redacted

Asylum Appeal / Motion to Reconsider with BIA:  A motion to reconsider is a request that the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) reexamine its decision in light of additional legal arguments, a change of law, or perhaps an argument or aspect of the case that was overlooked. See section 240(c)(6) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. § 1229a(c)(6) ; 8 C.F.R. § 1003.2(b); Matter of O-S-G-, 24 I&N Dec. 56, 57 (BIA 2006) see also Ma v. Ashcroft, 361 F.3d 553, 558 (9th Cir. 2004).

A motion to reconsider filed with the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) must be accompanied by a statement of reasons and supported by pertinent authority. See 8 U.S.C. § 1229a(c)(6)(C); 8 C.F.R. § 1003.2(b)(1); see also Iturribarria v. INS, 321 F.3d 889, 895-96 (9th Cir. 2003).

Asylum Appeal / Motion to Reconsider with Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA)

In this case, the Board’s last decision concluded that the respondent was barred from receiving asylum and withholding of removal because he provided “material support” to a terrorist organization. In making this conclusion, the Board agreed with the DHS that the material support bar does not contain a de minimis exception. Accordingly, the Board found that the respondent’ s one-time payment of $50.00 to Al-Shabaab as part of an agreement made to secure his release from kidnapping, constituted “material support” and prevented the respondent from being granted asylum or withholding of removal. See section 212(a)(3)(B)(iv)(VI) of the Act, 8 USC § 1182(a)(3)(B)(iv)(VI).2

In his motion to reconsider, the respondent states that he is not arguing that there is an “exception” to the material support bar for de minimis support. Instead, he states that “material support” must always be, in fact, ” material.” According to the respondent, the plain language of the statute requires ” material support” to be something other than de minimis. The respondent further observes that the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, the controlling circuit in this matter, has held that the word “material” in “material support” must be “ascribed some meaning.” Sesay v. Att’y General, 787 F.3d 215,222 (3d Cir. 2015), (citing Singh-Kaur v. Ashcroft, 385 F.3d 293, 298 (3d Cir. 2004) (examining Black’ s Law Dictionary definition of the word)). The respondent correctly argues that the Board’s last decision conflicts with the controlling law of the Third Circuit.

Asylum Appeal / Motion to Reconsider with Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA)

Accordingly, we now reconsider our decision insofar as it held that any amount of funds provided to a terrorist organization constitutes “material support” of that organization. We conclude that it was error to give no meaning to the word “material” in “material support.” The question that follows is whether the respondent’s one-time payment of $50.00 shortly before fleeing Somalia, is sufficient to be material.

The Board has previously indicated that a packed lunch and the equivalent of $4.00 in United States funds would not be material. See Sesay v. Att’y General, supra, at 221-22, (citing with approval an unpublished Board decision from 2009). In contrast, the Board has determined that the equivalent of $685 in United States funds made in multiple payments over several months was sufficiently substantial by itself to have some effect on the ability of a terrorist organization to accomplish its goals. Matter of S-K-, 23 I&N Dec. 936, 945-46 (BIA 2006) (finding it unnecessary to decide whether a small amount of money provided to a terrorist organization would be material support).

The Immigration Judge in this case did not conduct fact-finding concerning the amount the respondent paid to Al-Shabaab and specifically whether it would be sufficiently substantial by itself to have some effect on the ability of the terrorist organization at issue to accomplish its goals. Id. Accordingly, we find it necessary to remand the record to the Immigration Judge for further fact-finding. Therefore, we will grant the respondent’ s motion to reconsider our decision dated January 23, 2017. We will vacate that decision insofar as it found the respondent provided material support to Al-Shabaab, and we will remand the record to the Immigration Judge for further proceedings. On remand, both parties will be given the opportunity to submit additional evidence.

Asylum Appeal / Motion to Reconsider with Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA)

Motion to Reconsider Filed with the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA)
ORDER: The motion to reconsider is granted.  BIA Dec. 5-18-17_Redacted

 

Asylum Appeal / Motion to Reconsider with Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA)

Any appeal, motion or petition filed with the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) must comply with the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Practice Manual.  An experienced immigration attorney must be very familiar and knowledgeable about the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Practice Manual.

 

Los Angeles Immigration Attorney, Nikki Jacobson, Attorney at Law, Experienced Immigration Lawyers

Contact Us Now for a Consultation

 

2018 Temporary Total Disability (TTD) Rates

Los Angeles Workers’ Compensation Disability Benefits
2018 Temporary Total Disability (TTD) Rates


Division of Workers’ Compensation Announces 2018 Temporary Total Disability Rates

 

 

Los Angeles Workers’ Compensation Attorneys
2018 Temporary Total Disability (TTD) Rates

 

2018 Workers’ Compensation Disability Rates:  The Division of Workers’ Compensation (DWC) announces that the 2018 minimum and maximum temporary total disability (TTD) rates will increase on January 1, 2018. The minimum TTD rate will increase from $175.88 to $182.29 and the maximum TTD rate will increase from $1,172.57 to $1215.27 per week.

Los Angeles Workers’ Compensation Attorneys
2018 Temporary Total Disability (TTD) Rates

 

Labor Code section 4453(a) (10) requires the rate for TTD be increased by an amount equal to percentage increase in the State Average Weekly Wage (SAWW) as compared to the prior year. The SAWW is defined as the average weekly wage paid to employees covered by unemployment insurance as reported by the U.S. Department of Labor for California for the 12 months ending March 31 in the year preceding the injury. In the 12 months ending March 31, 2017, the SAWW increased from $1,164.51 to $1,206.92—an increase of 3.642 percent.

Los Angeles Workers’ Compensation Disability Benefits
2018 Temporary Total Disability (TTD) Rates

 

  • The 2018 minimum and maximum temporary total disability (TTD) rates will increase on January 1, 2018.
  • The minimum temporary total disability (TTD) rate will increase from $175.88 to $182.29.
  • The maximum temporary total disability (TTD) rate will increase from $1,172.57 to $1215.27 per week.
Los Angeles Workers’ Compensation Disability Benefits
2018 Temporary Total Disability (TTD) Rates

Los Angeles Immigration Seminar 05-10-2017

Los Angeles Immigration Lawyer, Los Angeles Work Injury Lawyer

Immigration U Visa: Victims of Violence/Crimes
May Be Eligible for Immigration Benefits

Speaker:  Nikki Mehrpoo Jacobson
Experienced Los Angeles Immigration & Workers’ Compensation Attorney
Certified Specialist Workers’ Compensation Law
The State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization

What About Injured Workers
Who Are Victims of  Workplace Violence/Crimes???

CAAA LAVAAA (Los Angeles-Valley) Seminar:
Immigration for Injured Workers:  Immigration U Visa

May 10, 2017

6:00 p.m.

Anejo Cantina & Grill

14755 Ventura Blvd,  Sherman Oaks, CA

This program will cover various Immigration and Workers’ Compensation crossover issues, including:

  • How will injured workers be affected by Trump’s New Executive Orders and Immigration Policies?
  • What every injured worker should know?
  • Injured workers’ immigration rights.  What rights do our client have?
  • What can all immigrants do if they are stopped, detained or deported?
  • How to advise injured workers about their immigration rights?
  • How to advise injured workers about encountering various law enforcement agencies?
  • DHS, USCIS, CBP, ICE, Local Police, Immigration Raids, etc…
  • Immigration consequences of convictions, arrests and criminal issues.
  • Work Permits
  • Humanitarian Relief
  • U Visas:  Crime Victims
  • T Visas: Victims of Trafficking
  • Labor Codes Applicable to Undocumented Immigrants
  • Deposition Guidance

Experienced Los Angeles Immigration & Workers’ Compensation Attorney

PROGRAM MATERIALS:  Immigration & WC Final

 

Contact Attorney Nikki Jacobson Now for A Consultation.

Victims of Violence/Crimes May Be Eligible for Immigration Benefits – Los Angeles Immigration Attorney

What About Injured Workers Who Are Victims of  Workplace Violence/Crimes???

Experienced Los Angeles Immigration & Workers’ Compensation Attorney